On the Psychology of Architecture and the Architecture of Psychology

Advisors need (a) to know what they are talking about and (b) be able to convince others. For architects, the first part is called 'architecture' and the second part could be called 'the psychology of architecture'. We tend to do that already, but most attention is paid to the role of the advisor. But it takes two to tango. The 'receiving end' (the one being advised) plays a key role and it is here that psychological and neurological research of the last few decades on 'the architecture of psychology' can be put to good use.

Let’s bury NIST’s outdated definition of Cloud Computing

The NIST definition of Cloud Computing from 2011 has now become so much an oversimplification that it is more often than not unhelpful, e.g. when trying to base your policies on it. So, forget about 'IAAS' and 'PAAS', end your 'cloud policies' or cloud-specific procedures. Instead, concentrate on managing the key generic issue underlying it: the ever more complex mixes of owned and outsourced algorithms and data..

Will McKinsey be the first ‘big consultancy’ that gets (enterprise) architecture right?

McKinsey seems to be the first 'big consultancy' that really frees itself from outdated, ineffective, orthodox enterprise architecture notions.

Amateurs talk Strategy, Professionals talk Logistics — that is kind of true in IT as well

It is an old adagium of warfare: Amateurs talk Strategy, Professionals talk Logistics. Maybe surprisingly, this is true in IT as well. Maybe it is true in any complex and unpredictable situation, which 'big IT' is more and more turning out to be. Logistics considers Strategy a small snack.

Wanted: IT advisor. No real IT insight required.

IT is one of the few fields where it is generally considered you do not need to understand it to make decisions about it.For good IT advisors, the kind that actually understand what they are advising about, the phrase 'we need an IT advisor who above all understands the business' is a warning sign that can easily mean an environment where being an IT advisor is like being a farmer sowing seeds on hard rock.

Should you derive your IT Strategy from your Business Strategy? Probably not too much.

It is generally accepted that IT Strategy must follow Business Strategy. It seems a no-brainer. But is it? There are reasons to look at it differently, reasons that become more pressing as organisations become more digital.

From Dark Scrum to Broken SAFe — some real problems of Agile-at-scale. And a way out.

There is a massive movement of organisations moving to agile-at-scale (e.g. SAFe). Ironically, it can turn into an organisation becoming one big 'project', the opposite of what agile wants to achieve.